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city initiatives -- you know, this -- the schering economy working group will interface with or connect with, and how does it fit in with existing strategic goals and plans of the city? >> i think our director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission -- emission free, carbon neutral. that is something that when you think about the economic impact of these new business models, it can contribute quite greatly to that. i am going to answer the question a little bit differently -- i have been inspired by this space considerably. there's a lot more opportunity. cars, so many assets we have in our society. as a city, we own buildings, cubicles, museums, golf courses, so much that we have -- >> yes, but it is our property, right? >> yes. that is a very good point. stewards of these resources, and they are often underutilized resources, so how do we improve access to those? there is a lot to learn from this that could be applied to the public comments. >> thank you. let's open it up. do we have a microphone for people to come to? ok, we will just it old school. if yo
materials and technology lad a bit. the u.s. economy added 146,000 jobs in november as the unemployment rate dropped to four year low of 7.7%. today's report may not be as strong as it seemed, reporting employers added 49,000 fewer jobs in september and october than initially estimated. a preliminary reading showing consumer confidence plunging to its lowest level in four months. early december americans prepare for a potentially higher taxes at the beginning of next year. the index dropping 74.5 this month, far below november's reading of 82.7 and economists forecasts of 82.4. >> in the pits of the cme, michael tells us why dividend paying stocks are taught play regardless of next year's tax rate and charlie will share why he is bullish despite short-term volatility but let's start with phil at the cme. the dow did well today. better than expected, arguably better than expected, jobs report boosting the markets but we got consumer confidence and the fiscal cliffhanging over everything. what did you make of the markets today? >> i was disappointed we failed on that rally and shot up 1421 and
british law. >>> the asian development bank has raised this year's outlook for five emerging economies. its board members cite strong growth in southeast asia, especially in the philippines and malaysia. the bank's board members revised their estimate from 5.6% in october to 5.9%. the five countries are the philippines, malaysia, indonesia, thailand, and vietnam. the bank official said third-quarter expansion in the philippines was high at 7.1%. they said rising consumption and public investment in malaysia is contributing to the region's growth. the story was different for japan. they lowered their 2012 growth estimate by 0.6 percentage points. they cited a drop in exports stemming from a territorial dispute with china. the bank officials say southeast asian economies are supported by solid domestic demand. they added the countries are relatively unaffected by the debt woes in europe. >>> as if to back up the ad bcs's projection, japan's economy remained out of steam in october. the latest key economic indicator fell for the seventh straight month. the cabinet office says the coincide
the economy avoid the cliff and rides above? anyway, senior u.s. economist and managing director at ubs. do you think we'll get a deal? >> i think we'll get a deal. do we get it before the holidays or after for markets, it matters. it's been a drag for the last nine months. so the idea that there is more uncertainty now than there was six months ago, how does that work? there was no fiscal cliff deal six months from now and still no deal. so i'm not sure why we think there's more uncertainty. i would say if you really think about it the president has a lot of ways to delay the impact. for example, our withholding table don't have to get change order january 1. even if you haven't struck a deal, you don't adjust the withholding tables. for now you can delay the pain. so there is wiggle room in terms of when the impact has to be felt. >> but is there where wiggle rom the investing world who looks at the united states and says these guys are a bunch of keystone cops. this cost us with the last round of negotiations back in the summer of 2011 when the debt rating agencies said if you can't find
in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom
call cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> the phone call was pleasant, but was just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, just more of the same. it's time for the president if he's serious to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> even though the president apparently designed the negotiating sessions at boehner's request. according to "the new york times," boehner insisted the talks include only himself and the president of the united states. boehner wanted senate democrats and nancy pelosi out of the discussions. democratic senator dick durbin told the times this is now the speaker and the president working this through. democratic leaders say they are satisfied with the briefings that they continue to receive. nancy pelosi seems perfectly happy putting pressure on the republicans. >> why are we not here to pass the middle income tax cut? why are we not here to even debate the middle income tax cut? could it be because the republicans have holding the middle income tax cuts as they have all a
this one and that is good for the american economy. >> we look back republican senator rand paul from the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less soc
think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hopefully privately other things are going on, but it will get done, but it will be very slow. >> john boehner with the proposal he put on the table, i did see commentary from some of the far right saying this is not an acceptable proposal. even his proposal is not acceptable. i did see comment it ter that came through. my question is does the president now have to alienate some of his far left base in order to reach a compromise. >> i think you'll see both of them have to actually bring the parties together. because you won't get everybody happy. some of the people who got voted on the ticket side, no, never. but it w
all economy we must put enments on the table. over the last four years entitlement spending is growing faster than the over all economy. this is why president obama has this country in record debt. that hurt the economy. take-home pay decreased under president obama. we must get entitlements under control. >> rick at the unemployment and housing vouchers. it is 800 billion extra spending. doesn't that have to be cut. >> there is no chance that there will be a dole without entitlement cuts. what senator durbin is talking about is the importance of focusing. if we want a deal you will not doing by taking a wide sprect rum approach. president clinton was clear when he spoke to the republicans. he pointed out that t biggest driver of the united states debt is medicare. he understands that we have to face up to the medicare problem. we need a solution. >> the conference that rick was referring tompt he said folks, i won and i get to make the decision and he grew the budget by 800 billion every year. one-time stimulus has happened every year of the presidency and the president through tim ge
it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom up process and we asked them what they wanted to have as their economic future. and try to -- we had 13,that pal over the state and trying to find an economic vision for the state county by county. how do we become more pro- business? we heard people wanted to -- safety and more pro-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resorts and quality of life. the real challenge we have been working on in turning this thing around is to say, how do we become the most pro-business state? california will be more pro- business. oregon will be more pro- business. how to create that competition to be the most pro-business state but to hold ourselves to higher standards. we want to be the best of being pro-business. that focus, trying to get the partisanship to -- our legislators and state voters are one-third independent, republican and democrat and our legisl
until our economy falls off the tax and fiscal cliff. just where do we stand on a deal coming out of washington, d.c.? cnbc correspondent joins us with all the details. >> reporter: as you know the white house's strategy since the election has been to break republican resistance on two issues. one is tax rates and one is an increase in the debt limit. he hasn't succeeded or budged off that attempt so far which is why john boehner came out in a news conference today and slammed the white house for not being willing to compromise. >> four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counter offer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk or economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> a few hours later you had a slight indication of flexibility from the administration. vice president joe biden was out. he reiterated those two nonnegotiable demands on the part of the administration but said the actual amount of that top rat
ever going to stop the tax increase. economy shrugged off hurricane sandy to create 146,000 new jobs, nearly double what forecasters had said, job creation for september and october was revised downward by a total of 49,000. another 350,000 people were so discouraged in november they simply stopped looking for work and left the labor force, which is why the unemployment rate dipped to 7.7%. >> raising taxes on small businesses is not going to help our economy and it's not going to help those seeking work. i came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table. take a step toward the president to try to resolve this. when he is going to take a step toward us? >> analysts say anxiety over the higher taxes from fiscal crisis is a reason that consumer confidence plunged in december. thompson reuters dropped to 74.5 in the consumer sentiment, lowest level since august. vice president countered that business leaders are telling him the economy will take off if there is a fiscal cliff deal. >> they have over $1 trillion out there to invest. if they think that the economy is goin
. it tells us what we know which is we have an almost stagnant economy. >> what is ok and what is troubling? guest: we are seeing some job creation. it is surprising the number of jobs created was 146,000. going into it, economists expected it to be half of that for two reasons. one was sandy up a center of the northeast. that through a lot of businesses offline. the other was economists thought businesses were getting freaked out by fiscal cliff situation in washington and basically would not necessarily be firing people basically putting everything on hold. they would simply not be making hiring decisions. there is other data saying that is what businesses are doing, and yet we saw a number saying all the new jobs. that indicates there is more momentum summer in the economy. host: retail is at the head of the list with 53,000 jobs. is that because of christmas? guest: they tried to take seasonal jobs out of it. that is not necessarily because of the holiday season. it does show consumers are shopping. that is one of the things you expect to come back early in a recession. those are not al
just during recessions. i do think that the economy can do better. i think we know that companies, i do still believe, our sideline, they are hesitant based on the uncertainty associated with washington and the economy. they have actually probably fallen a bit behind on the hiring they need to do. i do think we can do better than this. melissa: if we cut that this rate, it would take us nine years. is there anything we could be doing better? >> i know everybody says this, but i do think it is true. it is more certainty. if we get, not just a fiscal term agreement, a longer-term deal. if we were to be able to reach a longer-term deal, the grand bargain and for once and for all, put this uncertainty about taxes and spending to rest. i think that is what it would take. i think that is what would get hiring and investment back on. melissa: we saw a dip in consumer sentiment again. do you believe people are worried about the fiscal cliff? >> they are looking out what is right in front of them. we talked about this before. this is the first crack we have seen in sentiment. in the response and
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the economy added more jobs than expected in november, and the unemployment rate dropped to a four year low. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age
the white house. reports indicate that the president has adopted a strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president that the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we will continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending3 problem, not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, i believe he has an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call. also, it has to be increases in rates for the wealthy or no deal. >> the phone call was pleasant, but more of the same. it is time for the president to be serious and come back with a counter offer. [inaudible question] >> the risk the president wants us to take, increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produce 60-70% of the new jobs in our country. that is the
of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unemployment is probably a good thing, but when you expanded too far, it put a really heavy burden on the employers. as one lady called in on the last segment, the state she was from is obviously much higher than made is, but when it gets to a point that your state system goes broke, they put fees on the employer, and they cannot afford to pay the rates. host: mr. tanner? guest: the unemployment tax is generally under 1% even when you include the match that goes into the extended benefits. we're already running in federal debt more than 100% of gdp. once you get over 60% to 70% of gdp, that begins to slow economic growth. we are costing jobs. that is because that money is -- players are looking down the road and saying they're going to have to pay more in the future. we simply cannot afford to spend money, especially we do not have, and still e
than to stay in. won people drop out of the labor force they slow the economy. their productivity is gone, their contributions are no longer there, so this is a different situation we're facing today than we faced i really think since the end of the world war ii. >> brown: before the implication of the fiscal cliff,xplain it because different states have different impact. >> under normal economic times this say program that is governed by state law and administered by the state. and states pay up to 26 weeks of benefits, six months for people who lost jobs through no fault of their own. but if bad economic times historically congress has authorized additional levels of benefits. this time it is a program called the emergency unemployment compensation system. and there are four different tiers depending on how bad your state unemployment rate is every state gets 14 weeks. nine states get up to 47 a decisional weeks. and the rest are in betweenment but you have to be over 9% to get that additional 47 weeks. >> brown: so it is this program that is now caught up in the fiscal cliff ne
is going to take a more, i would say rational approach to how to deal with their own economy and how they deal with their own people, and how they deal internationally. and so i think generally there's been a feeling that there might be some hope there. however, now we are approaching, once again, a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the
of the economy is for everyone to pay more in taxes and guarantee a form of public goods. the most successful democracy is where it is structured around universe albens where everyone pays in and makes use of what the state provides. now, no leaders are making that argument. in the short run, they are right not to. getting rid of the entirety of the bush tax cuts for all brackets hurts the recovery. once we are in the recovery, we have to do at least that and more. the question is, does the death of the consensus mean american voters are ready to hear that? how will this president or the next make the case? joining me today, governor of connecticut, a senior research fellow at george mason university. senior economic director at naacp and a fellow at the roosevelt institute. it's great to have you all here. i like when i do these spiels, listen to withering criticism from the panel. what do you think of the thesis, at least about the politics of the undoing of the consensus? >> i think this focus on grover is just it's wrong. i mean grover is just one guy advocating for a position that i thin
forward, helping us revive this economy. we don't want to set them back. and so why not do what the senate did several months ago in passing a bill bipartisanly that protects the middle class from seeing their taxes raised? we only need a few dozen republicans, quite honestly, to get that done because we're about to sign a discharge petition that we are going to declare as democrats that we are ready to plass the middle class tax protection act which will make sure that middle-class families do not watch their taxes go up simply because republicans are intent on protecting millionaires and billionaires and are holding middle-class families hostage to that increasing tax. we believe we can end december, certainly before the holidays on a really good note, maybe still having some disagreement but at least let's agree that we're not going to let the american people watch congress play this game of chicken right before the holidays where the american people are the hostages when we know that we have bipartisan agreement on protecting the middle class. and so we are thrilled that mr. walz has t
that is balanced and allows for economic growth is to put our economy on a sustainable fiscal path which again, in itself produces positive economic benefits and revenues are part of it this. the president put forth and entitlement reforms and savings gleaned from our health care entitlement programs need to be a part of it. the president has been specific about that. >> brian: he's talking about generalitiys about unnamed cuts. jay carny goes on to admit if the president's proposal went to the democratically controlled senate it would not last. 92 where is the leadership. >> brian: running 1.1 trillion. they are unable to pass a budget for the last three years and you probably think that the fiscal cliff would not address these things. >> gretchen: don't you recall that the president said he had no interest in speaking to republicans until they agree to the tax increase on the top two percent wage earners . so that really doesn't. maybe he and jay carny hasn't had meetings. maybe they are not on the same page or maybe it is on purpose. to send out a different message. >> steve: the message in
and the speaker of house about to address perhaps this and other things. >> our economy and threatening jobs and the white house has wasted another week. you know, eight days ago secretary of state geithner came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes the president campaigned on. and they had more stimulus spending than it had in cuts. and -- indefinite, infinite, increase of the debt limit like forever. four days ago we offer ad serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then, there has been no counteroffer from the white house. instead, reports indicate that the president has adopted deliberate strategy the slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending problem. not a receive knew problem. the president doesn't agree with our proposal, i believe that
on the economy today. really competing signs. it's not all good. first the good though the labor department reports the economy added 146,000 jobs last month that exceeds what the analysts had been predicting. and the unemployment rate went down significantly really from 7.9% in october to 7.7% in november. and that is the lowest rate in this nation in almost four years. but then there is. this the government reports the jobless rate fell largely because more americans just quit looking for work entirely. and now an estimated 22.7 million americans are either unemployed or under employed. meaning they have put the job search on hold or they are working part time for economic reasons what about super storm sandy. analysts say it cut slew of hours. 67,000 americans with full-time jobs worked part time for weather-related reasons. in november, after the storm, that number spiked to more than a million people. traders on wall street said at first they didn't know what to make of the data. but boy the end of the day the dow you was up 81 points to close above 13,100. ed henry is live at the whit
? >> i think we'll get a deal. everyone realizes how important it is, our economy is moving up some, not fast enough but some, and to go over the cliff would be terrible. i think we'll get an agreement. the reason i think we'll get an agreement, what's standing in the way is revenues, particularly making that top rate go up to 39.6 but we're seeing real progress in that regard in two ways. first, a good number of republican conservatives, people like colter and crystal, said we have to do it. last week tom coburn said it's preferable, cutting deductions and business leaders who support mitt romney, the head of fedex and at&t saying let it happen. the president won the election on that issue and i think you will see our republican colleagues reluctantly say 39.6. >> let me interrupt and bring in senator corker. senator schumer's right, a growing number much republicans and conservatives, not a majority, but a growing number, are saying we have to cave on tax -- on raising tax rates, not just the idea of closing loopholes. would you accept returning to the clinton rate of 39.6% or wou
, these guys don't think that the economy is going to suffer that much. they think they will take credit. that is how they think. talk about social engineering. what happened to the jack kemp argument. what about empowerment. john f kennedy had the same thing. i don't want to bring some down and some up. i want to bring everybody up. where is that argument? >> and jack kennedy said, if you want to raise tax revenues, you must cut tax rates. the opposite of what obama said. they don't believe it. they want a western european style cradle to grave state. they want to make sure that they preserve it and they want to pay for it. the middle class is going to be nailed and they are going to blame republicans and they are going to have to go back to get more money. isn't it mostly true, taxing the rich, and you poll the whole electric. the middle income people believe they are going to be next. middle income say you are not going to get enough money there. they are going to hit me and there is going to be a carbon tax. president obama needs to expand the government. i wish the majority of the m
. >>> now to the numbers that at first glance look like they're very good news for the u.s. economy and the obama administration, the nation's jobless rate fell to 7.7% in november as employers added 146,000 new jobs. the jobless rate hasn't been this low during the entire obama administration, but that's only part of the story. a closer look also shows a big reason behind today's drop in the unemployment rate is that 350,000 people dropped out of the work force in november. they're discouraged, many of them are, that they simply quit and they're trying to find work. christine romans joins us from new york. we saw the unexpected drop in the unemployment rate, but christine, take us a little behind the numbers that make up the headlines. >> 7.7% is that unemployment rate, the lowest since december, 2008, from before the president took office. 146,000 jobs created, twice what economists have been expecting. they really didn't see the pull back because of hiring being depressed because of hurricane sandy. maybe you'll see some of that in the next month, but this was a strong report on
savings as part of that and invest in things that matter to the american economy. we think we can do that. we have a good chance to do it now. it's important that we do it. i think we're going to get there. >> given tough talk over the weekend, why aren't we waking up to down numbers, red arrows? >> europe is terrific. bond rates are phenomenal. a great run. china numbers are better. i think that there's a lot of people who feel like doug cast does who writes with me with a piece in "the new york times" saying that -- >> most stuff is nontaxable accounts any way. most stocks that people won't be as motivated to sell as people think. of course that doesn't necessarily deal with the increase in payroll taxes and the whole recession side of it. it does deal with the stock market side in terms of selling. >> why not say, listen, fiscal cliff, i have to cut numbers. i have to cut guidance. i think many ceos will cut guidance because of the possibility that the amt is going to -- this alternative minimum tax, people don't know they have to write a check for $3,500 at the end of the year. once y
group and give to the other. some say go to the clinton tax rate. we had a booming economy and creating more jobs. if increasing taxes increases economic activity, why don't we go to a 95% tax rate and then we'll really have a booming economy? the reason that no one proposes that is because no one really believes that. that's why the accelerated tax rate that's being recommended by the white house is also being proposed by another stimulus plan, a spending plan. here's the example that i can talk about with this. when people talk about just raise taxes in the upper 2%, well, here's an example of what's being proposed by the president. capital gains will go to 28.3%. dividends will go from 15% to 43.4%. now, i have a lot of people that will say to me, just raise it on the upper bracket. but when i tell them, can i tell you what that means? their taxes go from 15% to 43.4%, i have yet someone stop me and say, that's fair. it sounds so much easier to say, raise it on someone else, not on us. we have to solve the problem. just raising taxes doesn't solve the problem. we're spending $1 trill
to the fiscal cliff, this threatening of our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk or economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up. and we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> so here's my sense, congressman mccarthy. why in the minds of republicans aren't they processing it this way? look, president, we'll give you what you want on rates. let them go up. but we have to get something in return. big cuts in the medicare program, and we're willing to make a deal is. that essentially the thinking of speaker boehner at this point? >> the president wants the rates to go up, that doesn't solve the problem and we don't want to be back here in another year or 10 years answering the same question. but right after the election, we sent a plan to the president where we gave revenues but looking for spending cuts. and he took three weeks to come back to us. he has gone on still on the campaign trail, still working through. but you have
economy would take off and our country would be so much better off. >> chris, you understand the politics of the house from both sides. can john boehner cut a deal without eric cantor and paul ryan? >> i have a pretty good understanding of the house, but i always am a little afraid of wandering into house republican leadership politics. just to broaden the question a little bit -- i think the question is whether or not the speaker is going to be able to bring a good part of his caucus with him. that or require a united leadership team. >> i am talking short-term -- the next two or three weeks. >> i think that is going to be a requirement. i think one of the decisions the speaker will have to make is whether he is prepared to put a agreement on the floor of the house that might not have a majority of the republicans in the house in support. that is one of the questions. senator corker points out that there are a number of ways you can get to a yes on this, but it is not clear if there is a way to get to yes that necessarily brings a majority of house republicans. not that we cannot get a m
. earlier in the presidency, obama warneded it could hurt the economy. >> the nation is no longer in recession. and american manufacturing contracted in november for the first time in three months. the president is concerned enough that he proposed tens of billions in new stimulus spending in the debt talks. >> what is the justification for raising taxes? >> the fact of the matter is that it's vitally important that we extent and the president's view make permanent tax cuts for 98% of the american people. >> the president would like to see it done tomorrow and would sign it right away. >> they will put for ending deduction and closing loopholes. >> republicans move a great deal. who was the first person after the election was the speaker who went down and provided the re-knew. >> they blasted the proposal to limit deductions to tell bloomberg television it's unrealistic. >> that means every hospital and university and non-for profit, the agency. across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. >> they had a different view when he proposed to limit not eliminate c
, 146,000 new jobs. it's good news for the economy and good news for the president. president obama's approval rating is at a three-year rate. 53%. and 53% say they trust president obama to avoid the fiscal cliff. compared to just 36% who trust republicans in congress. also today speaker boehner said he wouldn't rule out an agreement to raise taxes as part of a fiscal cliff deal. but he also said there's no progress. this is what winning looks like. joining me now, e.j. dionne and thank you both for your time. senator solis, the jobless rate is at a four-year low. that's quite an achievement. >> yes, reverend re. but we still need to do more. in sectors like retail and health care and tourism and hospitality. we need to do more because people are still suffering. we've got to put jobs back in infrastructure and construction and put our teachers. that's why the president is working so hard so we don't go off the fiscal cliff so we keep the most vulnerable people out of harm's way. to pay $2,200. we've got to talk about fairness here and i'm very excited that the public is listening t
. that way congress couldn't blow up the world economy for no good reason. it's taking the sharp knife covered in explosives away from a kid who has a lot of temper tantrums. it's a good thing to do. the white house calls it the mcconnell plan because it's based on an idea that mitch mcconnell proposed become in july 2011. but even though it is mitch mcconnell's idea, even though he came up with it, mitch mcconnell is not for it. mitch mcconnell at this point does not support the mcconnell plan at all. he didn't think democrats did either. and yesterday he wanted to call their bluff. now that is when c-span 2 suddenly became amazing television. yesterday afternoon mitch mcconnell asked the senate to move to an immediate vote on the mcconnell plan. vote on it now. you figured harry reid would back down. prove that even democrats don't like this idea. but reid did not back down. he doubled down. he said, yeah, let's vote on the plan. but let's move to an immediate up or down vote. no filibuster, no 60-vote requirement, let's see if it gets 51. if so, it's passed. at which point, mcconnel
's no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that's threatening our economy and threatening jobs, the white house has wasted another week. >> welcome back to "hardball." that was speaker boehner's downbeat assessment of fiscal negotiations. he went on putting blame squarely on the president. let's listen. >> this president has adopted of a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. it's time for the president, if he's serious, to come back to us with a counteroffer. >> shortly after house ni mort leader nancy pelosi put the plame back on republicans. let's listen. >> the only obstacle standing in the way of middle income tax relief are the republicans unwillingness to ask the top 2% to pay their fair share. this is a moment of truth. the clock is ticking. christmas is coming, the goose is getting fat, but in many homes across america it's very -- a very, very lean time. >> and today's jobs report showing 146,000 jobs added in november and unemployment dipping to 7.7% may give the president some leverage in negotiations with boehner. but wh
of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to "hardball." here is one of the easiest predictions after any election, especially this one. the republican party would split in two. on one side you have the establishment republicans, the john boehner, mitch mcconnell wing of the party. to them the election was lost because the conservative ideologues pulled mitt romney so far to the right in the primaries he could never find his way back to the middle in november. on the other side is the right wing, jim demint, rick santorum, the talk radio conservative media industrial complex. they make the same argument ideologues always make when they lose. the problem to them was our guy wasn't ideological enough. the conflict is playing out in technicolor with demint blowing the united states senate to become the ceo of the conserva
and boy were they surprised. the economy created 146,000 jobs in november. not great, but a lot better than expected. the unemployment rate dropped stlytenths of a point to 7.7%. that's not quite as good as it sounds because it was mostly people who gave up looking for work and were dropped from the count. what does all of this mean to the recovery? here's anthony mason. >> reporter: the u.s. economy ndntinued to add jobs in november, despite worries about a looming fiscal cliff in washington and the effects of a k perstorm in the northeast. >> thank you very much. or reporter: at chobani, the greek yogurt maker based in new york, c.e.o. hamdi ulukaya has been hiring. how many employees do you have? >> close to 2,000. >> reporter: the turkish-born ulukaya started chobani just four years ago. since then, greek yogurt sales re g exploded. chobani is now nearly a billion- dollar business. >> think we're going to be over 5,000 to 6,000 people by five years. >> reporter: so another 3,000 or ll000. th yeah. >> reporter: nationally job f owth has been steady but slow. so far in 2012 the econo
also mean a great deal to the economy as well. it is estimated that this tax cut for the middle-class, if not passed, there will be $200 billion taken out of the economy next year. that will determine how many waitresses are working here, how many people -- how many sales persons there are when you see if you can help your sister with her car at. that will determine whether or not you have a job when you graduate. it is going to make a difference to your kids. they are struggling, working hard on their own. whether your son can go back and get his master's or save what he can to get back. that is going to affect economic growth. what we have going now -- there can be no debate. some of my very conservative friends continue to try to reject it is awful hard for them to accept compromise. the economy is beginning -- continuing to move. having met with all the stakeholders, we have met with a number of ceo's, a number of companies and small business people, labor community, progressive groups. the interesting thing that the business folks are telling us about is the downside of goi
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